11/08/2022

How F1 is accelerating the future of automotive performance engineering

Do you aspire to work in F1? Like the idea of engineering the race car of one of your heroes? 
 
Cars are a vital part of all our daily lives, but for some the automotive industry is much more than just going from point A to B. It’s an exhilarating and highly rewarding field to build a career in. 

automotive engineering
 
One particularly exciting aspect of the automotive sector is that it is always evolving; and we are seeing huge changes within the industry. The quickening pace of electrification and advances in connectivity technology are changing the ways cars are used, fuelled, and built. A lot of this is down to Formula 1 which has become the “fastest R&D lab on earth”, as recent technologies inevitably spread from the racetrack to the road.  

Learning how the car works, how we need them to evolve to be part of a greener future, or how to fix different problems are just some of the ways a passion for cars or engineering can not only find an outlet but enjoy a rewarding career. By studying at the University of Bolton, you will gain a broad understanding of this thrilling and diverse sector. Depending on your chosen course, an automotive performance engineering degree will give you the opportunity to study a range of topics such as performance optimisation, vehicle dynamics, aerodynamics, design, and manufacturing; preparing you for a life in the automotive industry with the relevant knowledge to enhance your career prospects. 
 
Engine ready? Tyres warm? Let’s explore how F1 is accelerating the future of the automotive industry! 
 
Incorporating Hybrid Engines  
 
Today’s environmentally aware society is driving a shift towards the production of either hybrid or fully electric vehicles as a way of reducing carbon emissions. But cleaner air is not the only reason to make the shift! From an automotive performance engineering perspective, the hybrid power units that are being used in F1 have a mind-blowing ability to convert fuel energy into engine power.  
 
In 2013, just one year before the introduction of hybrid power units in F1, the thermal efficiency of the average road car was around 30%. Four years of development later, the Mercedes team achieved an impressive 50% thermal efficiency from their F1 power unit, proving both the importance of their automotive engineers and the benefits of using F1 as a testbed.  
 
The Importance of Connectivity in F1   
 
The high-tech sensors that modern F1 cars contain make them the most connected cars in the world. There are more than 200 sensors in a Mercedes-AMG F1 car collecting information about temperature, tyre pressure, fuel consumption and more. In comparison, an average modern road car contains just 60-100. This is because to remain competitive in the racing environment, the cars need to be able to collect a lot of data so that racing engineers can improve on their performance by making well-informed strategic decisions during races and qualifying. 
 
The goal in F1 races is to win, and performance data is a key ingredient to that success. However, for the average Mercedes road car, there is a different mission. By adapting the technology and connectivity used in F1, the car manufacturer has been able to improve their plant efficiency, deliver a smoother driving experience, and progress their low emissions technology.   
 
Transforming Production Technologies  
 
Increasing digitalisation is a major part of what is being referred to as the ‘fourth industrial revolution,’ and the production methods of F1 and road cars are becoming more aligned. This is allowing road cars to be built in more complex shapes and processes, with new, more adaptable materials and technologies. The changing nature of automotive engineering means that F1 is also transforming the next generation of road vehicles.  automotive engineering

Careers with an Automotive Performance Engineering Degree 
 
Whether you are interested in the impact that formula one is having on the future of the automotive industry or like the idea of working in F1, an automotive performance engineering degree opens the door to a wide range of roles, such as: 
 
Aerospace Engineering  
Automotive Engineering  
Defence Engineering  
Motorsport Engineering  
Operations Management  
Simulation 
 
Your graduate job is just the beginning and will be a useful entry point in the industry on your way to turning your passion into a rewarding career.  
 
The University of Bolton: Motorsport and Automotive Performance Engineering Degrees 
 
How do you like the sound of studying in the UK’s only National Centre for Motorsport Engineering (NCME) on a course accredited by the Institute of Mechanical Engineering? This becomes a reality when you choose an automotive performance engineering degree at Bolton University. Our £13 million state-of-the-art specialist workshops and laboratories help our students graduate with the skills to enter the industry with confidence. 
 
Our passionate lecturers have over 40 years of extensive industry experience, supported by great industry relationships; M-Sport, Prodrive, RML Group, Ensign, and Keating Supercars, as well as leading BTCC race teams like Ciceley Motorsport and Speedworks Motorsport. We have over 50 students benefitting from the experience of live projects with our partners, and the NCME is globally recognised in the motorsport industry. 
 
We also understand the importance of our teaching; we are proud to have been voted in the Top 5 UK universities for Teaching Quality*. Our students and their needs are put first; just one of the reasons why they have voted us first for Student Satisfaction for the last five years**.  
 
Take your first step to accelerating your career by looking at our full course details.  
 
Making an application through Clearing  
 
Want to secure your place at Bolton University? Clearing gives you the opportunity until the 19 September to apply for university! 
 
For more information on how to start your Bolton journey, speak to our Student Services Team on 01204 903030.  
 
Get the dates in the diary! 
 
Register for one of our on-campus Study Advice Sessions and find out how we can support your career ambitions. You can chat with representatives from student finance, student services, and disability services; we are happy to answer any questions you may have. 
 
Places are limited so book now to secure your place. 
  
- Friday 19 August – 11am – 4pm  
- Saturday 20 August – 11am – 4pm  
- Thursday 1 September – 11am – 4pm  
 
Come and explore the supportive learning environment that our students love! 
 
*The Times and Sunday Times, Good University Guide – 2022 – UK 
 
**Complete University Guide – 2023, 2022, 2021, 2020, 2019 – Northwest 

No courses found

BEng (Hons) BEng (Hons) Automotive Performance Engineering (Motorsport)
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
96
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BSc (Hons) BSc (Hons) Motorsport Technology
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
96
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BEng (Hons) BEng (Hons) Sustainable and Electric Vehicle Engineering
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
104
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BEng (Hons) BEng (Hons) Automotive Performance Engineering (Motorsport) with foundation year
Full-time
Mode of study
4 years
Duration
48
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BSc (Hons) BSc (Hons) Motorsport Technology with foundation year
Full-time
Mode of study
4 years
Duration
48
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BEng (Hons) BEng (Hons) Sustainable and Electric Vehicle Engineering with Industrial Placement Year
Full-time
Mode of study
4 years
Duration
104
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

MA MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Full-time
Mode of study
12 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MA MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism): Extended
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Electric Vehicle Technology
Full-time
Mode of study
12 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Electric Vehicle Technology: January Start
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Electric Vehicle Technology: May
Full-time
Mode of study
13 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Engineering Management
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Motorsport Engineering
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

University of Bolton

BEng (Hons) BEng (Hons) Sustainable and Electric Vehicle Engineering
Part-time
Mode of study
54 months
Duration
104
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

MA MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Electric Vehicle Technology
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Engineering Management
Part-time
Mode of study
36 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc MSc Motorsport Engineering
Part-time
Mode of study
36 months
Duration

University of Bolton

HNC HNC BTEC Engineering (General Engineering)
Full-time
Mode of study
1 year
Duration
32
UCAS Points

Bolton College

HND HND BTEC Engineering (General Engineering)
Full-time
Mode of study
2 years
Duration
32
UCAS Points

Bolton College

HNC HNC BTEC Engineering (General Engineering)
Part-time
Mode of study
2 years
Duration
32
UCAS Points

Bolton College

HND HND BTEC Engineering (General Engineering)
Part-time
Mode of study
4 years
Duration
32
UCAS Points

Bolton College

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