22/04/2021

Categories: Community Development and Youth, Undergradute

Have our Young People Forgotten how to Socialise?

There is no denying that we live in a digital age, and this already posed questions regarding child interaction with peers, and whether the art of true conversation has been lost. However, with 12 months of lockdowns, the question of whether young people have forgotten how to socialise becomes even more pressing. We explore the issue of social interaction post-pandemic.

There is no denying that life has changed by astronomic proportions over the past 12 months. One of the big changes has been the social distancing and lockdown requirements, which means that many people have not been able to see their loved ones for quite some time.

For University students, student life has been tough. They have not been able to enjoy all of the social benefits that come with University life and for children and teenagers, not being able to see their friends will have felt strange and many are worried that it could hinder their development.

In addition to all this, we cannot overlook the mental health issues that plague our society at the moment. Social anxiety about meeting up with people once lockdown is over is very real, and many people worry about how they will act in social situations.

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The Fear of Socialising is Real

There have been a number of studies into child interaction with peers, as well as teenage and young adult interaction. One study, entitled Lessons from Lockdown, by Republic, a London-based agency, concluded that we are quickly becoming the generation of isolation or IsoGen. It was deemed that we are more likely to feel anxious and be worried about our mental health as a consequence.

The study revealed that uncertainty surrounding life after lockdown is highest amongst young people. In fact, one in two people age between 18 and 34 years were reported to have experienced anxiety during this period. Perhaps even more worrying is that 25 per cent of people in this age group have stated that their mental health has been impacted.

Whether going to picnics with friends or resuming school, people may feel nervous and apprehensive about the prospect of social interaction post pandemic. We cannot ignore the profound impact that the lockdown has had on our social needs and social circles. Therefore, listening to your emotions, taking time to breathe, and socialising only when you are ready could be good advice.

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Studying MSc Community Development & Youth Studies at the University of Bolton

If the art of social interaction is a subject that fascinates you, you may find that studying a postgraduate course in Youth Studies and Community Development could be just the thing for you.

Our community development and youth studies courses will enable you to learn all about social interaction and how we can make positive changes. Our lecturers are passionate and knowledgeable and are proud to provide a supportive, inclusive learning environment.

Not only do we offer excellent work opportunities for our students, but we pride ourselves on our friendly community. This is one of the reasons our University has been voted No.1 for Student Satisfaction the past three years*.

If you would like to delve into the world of youth studies, and you have any queries about our courses, you can find out more at enquiries@bolton.ac.uk. We are always happy to answer any questions that you may have.

Come and enjoy your study at the University of Bolton and see how we set the standard for #UniAsItShouldBe.

No courses found

BA (Hons) Community Development and Youth Work (endorsed route)
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
96
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BA (Hons) Community Development and Youth Work with foundation year
Full-time
Mode of study
4 years
Duration
48
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Full-time
Mode of study
12 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism): Extended
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MA Community Development and Youth Studies
Full-time
Mode of study
1 year
Duration

University of Bolton

MA Community Development and Youth Studies
Part-time
Mode of study
2 years
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc Human Society (with specialism)
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
Duration

University of Bolton

BA (Hons) Community Development and Youth Studies
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
96
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BA (Hons) Community Development and Youth Studies with foundation year
Full-time
Mode of study
4 years
Duration
48
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BA (Hons) Community Development and Youth Studies
Part-time
Mode of study
54 months
Duration
96
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BA (Hons) Community Development and Youth Work (endorsed route)
Part-time
Mode of study
4.5 years
Duration
96
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc Human Society (with specialism)
Full-time
Mode of study
12 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc Human Society (with specialism): Extended
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

University of Bolton

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We have the answers to your questions, find all the advice and support in one place.

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