The Centre for Opposition Studies invites you to: “Margaret Thatcher as Leader of the Opposition, 1975-1979”

By 12/11/2019University News

The Centre for Opposition Studies, UoB, and
The Centre for British Politics and Government, KCL
invite you to:
“Margaret Thatcher as Leader of the Opposition, 1975-1979”
with
Sir Adam Ridley and Emily Stacey
On Thursday, 28th November 2019 at 6.30pm
King’s College London, Strand Building, Room -1.04

In the first of a series of joint events to launch the Centre for Opposition Studies’ new academic network, the Centre for British Politics and Government at King’s College London will host a panel discussion examining Margaret Thatcher’s leadership of the Opposition between 1975 and 1979.

During this, the 40th anniversary year of Mrs Thatcher entering government, there has been much focus on her time in office. But less attention has been paid to how she got there, and the policy platform she developed in the years immediately prior to entering Number 10. We are pleased to present this seminar, featuring economist Sir Adam Ridley, who was a close adviser to Mrs Thatcher during those years, and Emily Stacey of Oxford Brookes University, whose research focuses on this period.

The event will be chaired by Dr Nigel Fletcher, Research Director of the Centre for Opposition Studies and a Teaching Fellow in the Department of Political Economy at King’s.

To reserve a place, please visit https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/margaret-thatcher-as-leader-of-the-opposition-1975-79-tickets-80217293083

Sir Adam Ridley was a member of the Government Economic Service 1965-74, serving in the DEA, HM Treasury and the Central Policy Review Staff. In 1974 he became Economic Adviser to the Shadow Cabinet and Assistant Director of the Conservative Research Department, becoming its Director in 1979. In conjunction with Chris Patten, he organised much of the party’s policy-making in opposition. From 1979 to 1985 he was Special Adviser to Sir Geoffrey Howe, Nigel Lawson and Lord Gowrie and was joint editor of the Conservative election manifestos of 1979 and 1983.