24/05/2021

Categories: Sport, Sport Rehabilitation and Physiotherapy, Postgraduate

Why Teach Sports in Secondary School?

Thinking of becoming a sports coach or teacher? Here’s why teaching sports at secondary level is a great career move, and hugely beneficial to school students!

Learning to teach in secondary school is a noble career choice, and specialising in physical education is extremely rewarding. This is because teaching sports goes far beyond fitness benefits, and can be a contributing factor that shapes teenagers for the rest of their life.

Here are just some of the reasons why secondary school sports is so important: 

1. Promote inclusivity and diversity

Playing sports can be a good way to bring people of all backgrounds and abilities together, improving inclusivity across the school system. By helping create connections that perhaps wouldn’t exist otherwise, you’ll be doing your part in making the world a friendlier place.

There’s a sport or activity for every child too, ranging from contact to non-contact, as well as team or solo. For sports teachers, helping students realise their personal strengths and growth potential is something that can bring huge job satisfaction.

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2. Teach them the importance of teamwork

Collaboration and teamwork are skills that impact every area of life, and they’re especially important for teenagers or young adults who are starting to explore career options.

This is why learning to teach at secondary school in sports and sports-related subjects can be such an impactful and meaningful career to choose. As a sports teacher, you’ll be responsible for ensuring pupils understand sportsmanship, humility and the art of being a team player.

The concept of collaborative working applies to every industry and sector, making team sports essential training for a successful career.

3. Get them interested in fitness

Make physical activity accessible and enjoyable for teenagers and young adults by learning to teach at secondary school. By teaching sports to this age group, you can drum up excitement about sports-related culture, nurture talent and future athletes, and instil important values about keeping fit.

Whether it’s team sports or individual sports, staying active is a great way of promoting the importance of exercise. This is also a fantastic opportunity to create the connection between diet and exercise, helping young people take care of their bodies and make responsible choices.

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4. Help them develop transferable skills

There are many skills teenagers can gain from playing sports. From discipline and organisational skills to being able to problem-solve effectively, physical education can get all those brain muscles moving.

There’s also the power of reliance, something that can be learned from not winning every single game, which is a fundamental lesson for everyone. Plus, playing in teams teaches young people to respect one another while abiding by rules, shaping them as better people as they enter adulthood.

5. Improve their mental wellbeing

Teaching sports at secondary level or beyond also supports mental health and wellbeing by giving teenagers an outlet to release their frustrations.

The sheer enjoyment of playing a sport can increase endorphins too, boosting mood, relieving stress and anxiety, and keeping depression at bay.

Are you ready to turn your sports-related degree into a teaching career? If you’re interested in teaching sports to people aged 14+, the PGCE M 14+ (Sport) programme at the University of Bolton could be for you.

We’re one of the largest teacher training providers in the UK, and have been a Top 6 UK university for Teaching Quality in The Times Good University Guide for the past three years.* So there’s nowhere better to begin your journey into teaching sports for secondary education.

Find out more about applying in September 2021 by visiting the course page.

If you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch on +44 (0)1204 903 394 or admissions@bolton.ac.uk.

 

*The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021, 2020 and 2019

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