25/05/2021

Categories: Sport, Sport Rehabilitation and Physiotherapy, Postgraduate

Video Physiotherapy: How Healthcare has Adapted in COVID

There’s never been a more important time for healthcare to embrace digital technology, and video physiotherapy could be here to stay, taking future physiotherapy careers in a new direction…

Are you looking to turn your sports, sports science or healthcare degree into a career in physiotherapy? The University of Bolton’s MSc Physiotherapy (Pre-registration) course is a pathway to getting registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and it’s ideal for anyone looking to get the most up-to-date skills for the industry.

Right now, it’s an exciting time to retrain and upskill, and the huge changes in the sector are creating new physiotherapist roles, including a rise of video physiotherapy brought about by the pandemic.

Here’s a look at how healthcare has adapted to COVID, and how these changes will impact the future of healthcare services and delivery.

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The new concept of ‘physio anywhere’

The pandemic created a need for digitally-enhanced outpatient care. Due to government lockdowns, many health services, including physiotherapy, quickly transitioned to remote working practices. In order to comply with government rules, video technology was adopted and patients were seen via screens instead of in person. 

This has made the concept of ‘physio anywhere’ possible, and it is set to become a lasting legacy of the virus.

For this concept to be successfully delivered, the following must be seamlessly enabled:

- Remote working – physiotherapists working from home and other remote locations, without access to their usual clinic or studio

- Remote assessment – cloud-based platforms and digital technology must be accessible for video physiotherapy to take place

- Remote monitoring and rehabilitation – building strong patient-therapist relationships and the provision of exercises are necessary to ensure continued monitoring and long-term rehabilitation for patients

The benefits of remote physiotherapy

Although the use of video physiotherapy has been deployed as an emergency measure during COVID, it’s likely that this remote service will be here to stay.

The hands-off approach can be highly effective for a number of conditions, and may not require touch for the purpose of assessment. Some conditions that are suitable for remote care include:

- Musculoskeletal conditions

- Orthopaedic rehabilitation

- Respiratory illness

- Physical activity for long-term conditions

- Neck and back injuries

- Sports-related injuries

Furthermore, video physiotherapy can be suitable for people who find it hard to get to a clinic, making services even more accessible in the future. These people could find travelling difficult due to the following reasons:

- Mobility issues (such as having a physical disability)

- Financial issues

- Transport issues

- Work commitments or caring responsibilities

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Remote physiotherapy careers

For many graduates entering the sector in the coming years, the opportunities for remote working will be on the rise. If you are interested in a flexible role that helps to improve accessibility for patients, this is a great time to study.

For physiotherapists, the possibilities of video physiotherapy are endless and can be used across all areas, including sports physiotherapy, paediatric physiotherapy, geriatric physiotherapy, neurological physiotherapy, rehabilitation and pain management.

To find out more about applying in September 2021, see our MSc Physiotherapy (Pre-registration) programme page.

Our courses are based in our £31 million Bolton One facility, a dedicated sport, leisure, health and research centre. And we’ve been a Top 6 UK University for Teaching Quality in The Times Good University Guide for the past three years.* So there’s nowhere better to build your physiotherapy career!

If you have further questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch on +44 (0)1204 903 394 or admissions@bolton.ac.uk.

 

*The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021, 2020 and 2019

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