09/04/2021

Categories: Dental Technology, Postgraduate

New Study Shows Urgent Need to Tackle Oral Health Post-COVID

There has never been a more important time for highly-skilled dentists and dental technicians. Find out more about our clinical dental technician course…

The COVID-19 pandemic has meant that a lot of important things have been put on the backburner. From weddings and celebrations to important healthcare check-ups, many people’s lives have been on pause.

Dental care has suffered the same fate, with many dentist surgeries closing as the country goes into lockdown, or running with restrictions in place. With only emergency dental appointments being prioritised, the nation’s oral health has declined.

A recent study conducted for World Oral Health Day (in Europe and South East Asia) reveals:

30% of people have visited dentists less often than usual due to COVID

43% of people said they were worried about virus transmission at the dentist

Despite this, 64% plan to visit their dentist in the coming months

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UK dentists warn of mouth cancer rise

In line with the Europe and South East Asia study, UK dentists have also warned about a dental health crisis as patients struggle to get an appointment via the NHS. An increase in oral cancers could be likely as dentists are often the first to spot signs of disease.

Despite general oral health statistics in the UK being promising, there are still nearly two in five (39%) of adults that don't go to the dentist regularly, and almost one in three (31%) of adults have tooth decay.

This makes dental technology a vital subject to study, as advancements in technology help to make trips to the dentist faster, more efficient, and a better experience with less pain and discomfort.

The use of digital technology in the dentist surgery also improves patient confidence in procedures, and can make treatments more affordable. So there’s never been a better time to study a clinical dental technician course.

More than just oral health at stake

As well as being able to spot tooth decay and gum disease, dentists can also spot signs of mouth cancer, making routine check-ups vital post-COVID.

Furthermore, dentists can detect many other illnesses in the body, including high blood sugar and diabetes, pancreatic cancer, heart disease, kidney disease, osteoporosis, HIV, celiac disease, Anemia, and more.

They can often identify drug or alcohol abuse in patients too, as well as eating disorders like bulimia as it erodes away enamel.

As lockdown restrictions ease, the need for regular dentist visits will be key. So there’s never been a more important time to increase your skills as a dental technician.

New technology can be transformative for the patient experience. By making each visit a pleasant, painless experience, we can encourage more people to book check-ups frequently.

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How digital dental technology helps patients

By improving the experience of dental treatments, technology can strengthen dentist-patient relationships and build trust. With regular check-ups, dentists can encourage better oral health by advising patients on preventative measures.

Preventative dentistry is a concept that sees us moving away from the old ‘drill and fill’ approach, meaning we spot signs of decay and tooth erosion early on.

Technology such as an intraoral cameras can capture dental imagery with 20x magnification, making it easier to see early signs of decay. While soft tissue lasers allow technicians to perform non-invasive procedures with precision.

If this sounds interesting to you, find out more about the University of Bolton’s MSc Digital Dental Technology course. Our £4.8 million Centre for Dental Sciences features state-of-the-art laboratories, making us one of the best places to upskill in this subject.

We’re also in the Top 10 in the UK for Student Satisfaction in Medical Technology* for the third year running!

See our clinical dental technician course, which starts in September.

* Complete University Guide in 2021, 2020 and 2019, North West region

No courses found

BSc (Hons) Dental Technology
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
96
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Full-time
Mode of study
12 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism): Extended
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc Digital Dental Technology
Full-time
Mode of study
1 year
Duration

University of Bolton

MSc Digital Dental Technology
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
Duration

University of Bolton

FdSc Dental Technology
Part-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
48
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
Duration

University of Bolton

FdSc Dental Technology
Part-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
48
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BSc (Hons) Dental Technology (top-up)
Part-time
Mode of study
2 years
Duration

University of Bolton

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Help Centre

We have the answers to your questions, find all the advice and support in one place.

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Bolton college
Alliance learning
Anderton centre2
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TEF Silver QQA