19/07/2021

Categories: Psychology, Undergradute

Adapting Psychology to the Autistic Brain

It was over 50 years ago when Leo Kanner created his first description of classic autistic syndrome. In the years since then there has been a significant amount of research that has helped us to begin to understand more about autism.

 

It is currently estimated that there are approximately 700,000 individuals in the UK with an autism diagnosis, with one in 100 UK children being diagnosed as being on the autism spectrum. Some people who have such a diagnosis can struggle with education, while others struggle in social settings or workplaces. Psychologists can be useful in helping autistic people to get through these struggles, but psychology for neurodiverse people must be tailored to their specific needs.

What is Autism?

When you mention autism to people, some may think of the character played by Dustin Hoffman in Rain Man. However, not every person on the autistic spectrum is the same. Autism is defined as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. It affects the way in which a person processes information. Individuals with autism can have difficulties with communication and social skills, they can struggle with emotions, and some individuals are nonverbal. If you have met and interacted with one person with autism you have not met or interacted with the wide and varied spectrum that encompasses autism as a whole. Whether you believe autism is a disability or not, it is protected under the Equality Act 2010. This means that reasonable adjustments should be made in order for any individual to receive the most appropriate support. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), is considered to be the “gold standard” in psychotherapy, and those with autism can benefit from it. However, CBT in autism may look a little different than it would for a neurotypical individual.

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How can CBT be adapted for those with Autism?

When it comes to autism in psychology it is necessary to make some adjustments in order to combat the challenges in the way people with autism react to situations. CBT is a shorter-term, talking therapy that is goal-focused, so when dealing with autism in psychology it is important that the therapist has some understanding of autism so that they can adapt how they deliver this therapy. Making use of interests and hobbies, using visuals and considering sensory differences can help CBT in autism work. In addition, an understanding that a systematic approach is often required for the very literal mind of anyone with an Autism diagnosis is crucial. If a CBT practitioner can adapt their approach in these ways, they can make CBT in autism as effective as it can be.

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BSc (Hons) Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Bolton – Shaping the Future

The human mind is a fascinating thing and even more so when a person has a diagnosis of autism. If you are considering a career in this field then there has never been a better time to take those first steps in further education to shape the future of those who may require psychological help.

At the University of Bolton, we offer an undergraduate BSc (Hons) Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience degree course that can pave the way to a truly rewarding career. The University of Bolton has been voted in the Top 10 in the UK for Teaching Quality for the third year running*, and our knowledgeable lecturers will help you gain the expertise, knowledge and skills that are required for a career in psychology with plenty of opportunities for advancement.

 

It’s not all about the quality of our educational provision, however. We offer a university experience that is diverse, inclusive and welcoming, which we believe plays a significant role in helping students enjoy #UniAsItShouldBe.

If you would like to learn more about the university and our Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience degree course, we would be delighted to talk to you. Our team of friendly advisors can be reached on +44 (0)1204 900 600 or by sending a message to enquiries@bolton.ac.uk.

 

*The Times and Sunday Times 2021, 2020, 2019

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BSc (Hons) Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
112
UCAS Points

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3 years
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112
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1 year
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36 weeks
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MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Full-time
Mode of study
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MSc Psychology (Conversion): January Start
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18 months
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Part-time
Mode of study
4.5 years
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112
UCAS Points

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Part-time
Mode of study
4.5 years
Duration
112
UCAS Points

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Part-time
Mode of study
4.5 years
Duration
112
UCAS Points

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MSc Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
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Part-time
Mode of study
3 years
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University of Bolton

BSc (Hons) Psychology
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
112
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BSc (Hons) Psychology, Psychotherapy and Counselling
Full-time
Mode of study
3 years
Duration
112
UCAS Points

University of Bolton

BSc (Hons) Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience
Part-time
Mode of study
48 months
Duration
112
UCAS Points

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MA /MSc Professional Practice (Specialism)
Part-time
Mode of study
24 months
Duration

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Full-time
Mode of study
4 years
Duration
48
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MSc Psychology
Full-time
Mode of study
18 months
Duration

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MSc Psychology (Conversion)
Part-time
Mode of study
2 years
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Part-time
Mode of study
30 months
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Part-time
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Mode of study
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2 years
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