04/05/2020

Why are knees such a problem area for female athletes?

It is natural for athletes to receive injuries from time-to-time, either doing too much over a period of time or not enough to protect their body from exhaustion. Yet, for some athletes, these injuries repeat over-and-over, until eventually, they stop being active. 

Tennis players and golfers often get ‘tennis’ or ‘golfers’ elbow; footballers often have calf or hamstring injuries. Most of these injuries go alongside the type of activity athletes take part in. Over the years, there has been a realisation of a particular injury that doesn’t relate to a sport, but women. 

Although male-orientated sports receive more knee injuries, female athletes are far more vulnerable than men. Despite how the much women and men are equal in their sporting efforts, there are some parts of them that are hardwired to perform differently. 

When it comes to the knee, all the muscles surrounding it must work together to keep it in condition, quadriceps, hamstrings, calves and more. For men, they often engage their hamstring first, whereas women lead with their quadricep; this initial movement affects and strains the knee ligaments. 

Another example of the difference is that when women land from a jump, their knees are held closer together than men’s, which increases the chances of an anterior cruciate ligament injury. 

These small actions immediately put women at a greater risk of injury while playing sport. As we know, many sports require the movement of knees, meaning that for most females, there is no escape of this risk. 

While many of these injuries are difficult to avoid, there is someone who can be relied upon to help prevent and rehabilitate these athletes, physiotherapists. For many physio’s it is taking the opportunity to help someone in pain and give them a new lease on life that motivates them in their career. Not only do physio’s help get athletes back to their peak, but they also care for them over a length of time and give them the support they need to remain injury-free. 

If looking after athletes from a variety of sporting backgrounds sounds like something you’d like to do, you’ll need a suitable qualification for the sector. Check out the University of Bolton’s Physiotherapy courses here to find out more. 

It is natural for athletes to receive injuries from time-to-time, either doing too much over a period of time or not enough to protect their body from exhaustion. Yet, for some athletes, these injuries repeat over-and-over, until eventually, they stop being active. 

Tennis players and golfers often get ‘tennis’ or ‘golfers’ elbow; footballers often have calf or hamstring injuries. Most of these injuries go alongside the type of activity athletes take part in. Over the years, there has been a realisation of a particular injury that doesn’t relate to a sport, but women. 

Although male-orientated sports receive more knee injuries, female athletes are far more vulnerable than men. Despite how the much women and men are equal in their sporting efforts, there are some parts of them that are hardwired to perform differently. 

When it comes to the knee, all the muscles surrounding it must work together to keep it in condition, quadriceps, hamstrings, calves and more. For men, they often engage their hamstring first, whereas women lead with their quadricep; this initial movement affects and strains the knee ligaments. 

Another example of the difference is that when women land from a jump, their knees are held closer together than men’s, which increases the chances of an anterior cruciate ligament injury. 

These small actions immediately put women at a greater risk of injury while playing sport. As we know, many sports require the movement of knees, meaning that for most females, there is no escape of this risk. 

While many of these injuries are difficult to avoid, there is someone who can be relied upon to help prevent and rehabilitate these athletes, physiotherapists. For many physio’s it is taking the opportunity to help someone in pain and give them a new lease on life that motivates them in their career. Not only do physio’s help get athletes back to their peak, but they also care for them over a length of time and give them the support they need to remain injury-free. 

If looking after athletes from a variety of sporting backgrounds sounds like something you’d like to do, you’ll need a suitable qualification for the sector. Check out the University of Bolton’s Physiotherapy courses here to find out more. 

myBolton

Download the app for your smartphone from:

Part of the University of Bolton Group

Bolton college
Alliance learning
Anderton centre2
tef silver qqa iipLogo

Part of the University of Bolton Group

Bolton college
Alliance learning
Anderton centre2
tef silver
qqa
iipLogo