02/06/2020

What a career in Clinical and Biomedical Sciences looks like

Deciding on a career path can seem like a tremendous task to begin with. After studying multiple subjects for years, you finally have an idea about what you enjoy learning and potentially a career to pursue. The next step is to look for a degree in the industry you want to head into.

In this blog, we will be looking at a career in Clinical and Biomedical Sciences. For those who love to jump into the labs and try to discover what is wrong with a patient but also improve their condition, it’s a great career option. At the end of this blog, you will know will have a better insight into the industry.

Potential careers

Clinical and Biomedical Science covers a wide area of biology. There are over 45 different specialisms that you can focus on after your degree, but one of the most popular job roles is becoming a microbiologist. Those who work in microbiology labs are needed across many NHS trust hospitals, as well as in private research facilities.

A microbiologist will spend time looking at life forms and other biological processes through a microscope; studying the interactions, growth and characteristics of organisms such as bacteria, fungi, parasites and algae. Most microbiologists will go on to specialise in more specific areas of the role, such as virology, immunology, or bacteriology.

Day-to-day, a microbiologist will prepare and test samples, then report their findings and send the results to the doctors. This may seem like a straight-forward job, but it requires a lot of attention- to-detail for long periods. It is vital that sample numbers are not mixed and that every patient gets the right diagnosis.

In the spotlight

Eric Lander is one of the most influential biomedical researchers in the modern era and is ranked top in his field by the Semantic Scholar, a scientific literature search tool. He graduated from Princeton University and then completed his Doctor of Philosophy at Oxford University. Now he is a Professor of Biology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Professor of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School; he was also co-chair on Barack Obama’s Board of Advisors on Science and Technology.

To start your career in the fascinating world of biomedical sciences, you will need an Undergraduate degree, although many interested in the subject area will continue their studies as part of a Postgraduate degree. There has never been a better time to study at the University of Bolton click here to find out more information.

 

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Part of the University of Bolton Group

Bolton college
Alliance learning
Anderton centre2
RiSE pos rgb logo
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iip Logo