Lord and Entrepreneur visit the University

Posted on Tuesday 17th March 2015
Chinese-Lord-visit

University staff and the delegation

As part of its continuing engagement with China, the University is delighted to have welcomed Lord Nat Wei and Pong Yipp, founder and Non-Executive Chairman of China Pacific Capital, who visited Bolton last week.

Lord Wei was co-founder of Teach First, an organisation which aims to ensure no child’s educational success is limited by their socio-economic background. Teach First helps train and support teachers in schools across low-income communities. Lord Wei is also the first British-born person of Chinese origin to have become a member of the House of Lords.

Professor George E. Holmes, Vice Chancellor of the University, met with Lord Nat Wei and Pong Yipp to discuss a number of collaboration and investment initiatives linked with the University’s exciting development programme.

They were treated to a guided tour of the new £10m UTC by Assistant Vice Chancellor (Development), Bill Webster, Provost for the UTC Development, Zubair Hanslot, and Director of Business Development, Martyn Shaw.

Mr Yipp was very interested in the possibility of the UTC, which will specialise in health sciences and engineering technologies when it launches in September 2015.

Following that, Dr Rory Perrett, head of Engineering at the University, explained the vision for the Centre for Advanced Performance Engineering with the development of the new STEM Centre to Lord Wei and Mr Yipp, who both took the opportunity to sit behind the wheel of two of the Centre’s racing cars.

Both Lord Wei and Mr Yipp were very positive about these initiatives under which students will spend time in the workshop as well as on the racetrack to fully prepare them for working in the motorsport industry.

The tour concluded with a visit to the University’s state-of-the-art clinical simulation suite, where the Clinical Practice Lead, demonstrated the University’s revolutionary Anatomage virtual dissection table, and ‘Sim-Man’, the University’s state-of the-art resuscitation teaching equipment.