Prof. John T. Haworth has a Bsc (hons) in Biological Sciences, a Ph.D in Psychology and a Masters degree in Fine Art.

He is currently a Visiting Professor in Well-Being at the University of Bolton, Bolton, UK. Formerly at Manchester Metropolitan University and The Victoria University of Manchester, he has been Visiting Professor at the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia; and Visiting Research Scientist at the Center for Consciousness Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA.

His two overlapping areas of research together constitute a focus on ‘Consciousness, Creativity and Well-being’. He has published extensively on Work, Leisure and Well-Being; and is a founder member of the Leisure Studies Association. He has given presentations at international conferences world wide. He has established a website on well-being www.wellbeing-esrc.com as part of a seminar series funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, and in July 2007/12 Palgrave MacMillan published ‘Well-Being: individual, community and social perspectives’ edited by J.Haworth and G.Hart.

His current research on well-being is focussing on the importance of enjoyment in daily life. It can be seen in Haworth, J (2014) ‘Leisure, Life, Enjoyment and Well-being’ in (eds) S Elkington and J. Gammon. Contemporary Perspectives in Leisure. London:Rouledge p39-53. His practice led research into creativity and embodied mind in digital fine art, has been funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. It can be seen on the website www.creativity-embodiedmind.com In August 2013 he gave an invited presentation and exhibition of his work at an International Conference on ‘Aesthetics and Embodied Mind’ in Delmenhorst, Bremen, with a chapter included in a book in press, and in September 2013 gave a presentation and had work exhibited at  The IMPACT 8 International Printmaking Conference in Dundee. His art work has been exhibited internationally. He has had a paper on ‘Well-being, Enjoyment and Creativity’ accepted for presentation at an International Conference on ’Cognitive Futures in the Humanities’ at Durham University, April 2014. A ‘Comment’ on ‘Enjoyment and Well-Being’ has been accepted for publication in the first issue of ‘The Journal of Mental Health and Well-being’