clinical simulation

The Clinical Simulation Suite within Bolton One is a simulated clinical environment complete with simulated patients. This allows the academic team at the University of Bolton to educate health professionals in a unique, realistic and dynamic way. In short, this ensures that our graduates are able to provide the highest standard of care for their patients.

So if you are considering studying a clinically relevant course, the University of Bolton is well equipped to ensure that both your educational needs and the clinical needs of your patients are met in an innovative, enjoyable and unforgettable way.

Simulation as an educational tool was first used in the aviation industry with the introduction of air craft flight simulators used in the training of pilots. Air craft flight simulators expose trainee and experienced pilots to situations that are difficult to recreate in real life without risking life, injury and damage to expensive equipment. Today it is difficult to imagine a pilot would be allowed to fly without having first received training in a flight simulator. The provision of health care has much in common with the aviation industry in terms of the potential for injury to patients (in place of passengers) if the service provided by health professionals were to be less than optimal.

Thanks to our new clinical simulation suite – and the introduction of complex computerised manikins – a similar type of education to that given to pilots can now be offered to health professionals training at the University of Bolton. The computerised manikin acts as a patient simulator that can be programmed to challenge and test health professionals’ knowledge and skills. The manikin senses treatments that are given to it and reacts accordingly. Alongside this, the supervising academic team can change how the manikin responds in light of other interventions provided by attending students.  

The ability to simulate the challenges that health professionals will face in the real world means that the education that is provided by us at Bolton goes far beyond the simple acquisition of clinical knowledge and skills. Thanks to the deployment of clinical simulation in our curriculum, students who graduate from Bolton are not only knowledgeable and skilful but also have a strong insight into how and when to use their clinical knowledge and skills. Traditionally this level of decision-making ability could only be derived from experience. Now, thanks to the ability to simulate a wide range of complex clinical scenarios, this sort of tacit knowledge about when and how to use skills can be learned much sooner than would have otherwise been the case.